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Flying the Coop -- EatingWell

Finalist, 2017 IACP Award for Food Writing That Makes a Difference

Images of featherless hens in crowded cages have spurred a nationwide commitment to cage-free eggs. But a recent batch of studies muddy the waters of animal rights ardor. What should a consumer do?
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Clucked! -- Men's Health

Winner, 2015 ASJA Award for Best Service Article

The chicken we eat is almost always contaminated with bacteria, and antibiotics are increasingly unable to kill them. What to do?
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The Whole-Grain, Reduced-Fat, Zero-Calorie, High-Fiber, Lightly Sweetened TRUTH About Food Labels -- EatingWell

Winner, 2014 James Beard Foundation Award
Winner, 2014 ASJA award for Best Service Article
Finalist, 2014 Bert Greene Award
The people most susceptible to manipulative food labels are the ones who care the most about nutrition.
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Solving the Sugar Puzzle -- EatingWell

Winner of the 2013 ASJA award for Best Service Article
Winner of the 2013 James Beard Foundation Award

Robert Lustig, MD, says sugar is a poison and should be regulated by government. But many scientists think he's going way, way too far.
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Glass Half Full? -- EatingWell

Or is it half empty? Proper hydration can help you run harder, think better, even improve our national security.
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Addicted to Food? -- EatingWell

Food may enslave the brain just like drugs, says NIDA director Nora Volkow. Her research could help us take back control.
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The (Surprising) Truth About Salt -- Good Housekeeping

Finalist for a 2011 National Magazine Award
Finalist for the 2011 Bert Greene Food Journalism Award

Doctors have been telling us for decades that it's one of the villains in our diet, and public health leaders have started a crusade to slash salt from the food supply. But there seems to be no definitive proof that lowering salt prevents heart disease or death.
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Captain of the Happier Meal -- EatingWell

Winner of the 2011 James Beard Foundation Award
Joe Hibbeln believes our diet is making us depressed, addicted, and violent. He thinks he's found a simple solution.
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How To Feed Your Mind -- EatingWell

Winner of the 2009 James Beard Foundation Award
More and more, studies are showing that what you eat can help your mind and memory, from infancy to old age
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Bring Out Their Best -- Cooking Light

Coax more flavor and nutrition from your produce with these secrets to proper care and handling
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Miracle Up North -- EatingWell

Winner of the 2007 Bert Greene Food Journalism Award
Finalist for the 2007 James Beard Foundation Award

Finlandís rates of cardiovascular disease have plummeted 75% since the 1970s; a radical national health director with an ambitious country-wide plan was the reason.
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Faux Food:
Where have all our nutrients gone? -- EatingWell

Finalist for the 2006 James Beard Foundation Award
Processing food often replaces healthy nutrients with unhealthy ones; our rates of disease are increasing as a result.
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Eating healthier with Latin faves -- The Arizona Daily Star

Traditional Mexican fare is far healthier than the foods immigrants eat upon arriving in the US.
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Oh MyPyramid -- The Arizona Daily Star

A userís guide to the new USDA food pyramid.
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Adding Color to a Miniature Monochrome World -- BioTechniques

After 15 years of research, the late, Nobel Prize-winning, scientist Roger Tsien and his colleagues bring multicolor labels to electron microscopy. Three new discoveries have already emerged.
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CRISPR for the Masses -- BioTechniques

Anyone can buy inexpensive CRISPR kits online. What are they doing with them, and should such powerful genome editing tools be so easy to access?
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Cells Communicate Via the Telephone Game -- BioTechniques

A cell biologist, a systems biologist, and a theoretical biophysicist challenged a decades-old theory by showing that cells in a collective can sense differences in chemical concentration undetectable by single cells.
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Treating Cancer With Your Own Personal Vaccine -- BioTechniques

Using a mouseís own tumor DNA, researchers created personalized vaccines that cause the immune system to destroy the tumor. Human cancer patients in a new clinical trial are already receiving vaccines.
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Long Live the Y Chromosome! -- BioTechniques

Genetic remnants of a few rich, powerful men who lived hundreds or thousands of years ago still flourish. What does this mean for human evolution?
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The Power to Program Life -- BioTechniques

Scientists have been using an amazing technique called CRISPR to turn off particular genes, and now to regulate entire genetic networks. Could this new technology help us someday cure diseases like type 2 diabetes and heart disease?
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How the Firefly Gets Shiny -- BioTechniques

A new technique confirms how the bugs flip their light switches; it could also help researchers visualize other tiny biological structures.
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Strong Muscles Stop Stress-induced Sadness -- Biotechniques

Researchers have discovered one big reason why exercise improves depression, and it has everything to do with muscle. Could scientists use this information to create anti-depressants that work without ever entering the mind?
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Whatís Up, Doc? A Bevy of Brain and Behavior Genes Breed Bugs Bunny -- BioTechniques

Whatís the difference between wild and domesticated animals? Researchers sequenced rabbit genomes and discovered a smattering of small changes that led to tame animals.
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The Nucleus Is a Piston -- BioTechniques

New research shows that the nucleus generates pressure in the front of human cells, moving the cells forward in a way never seen before. Is this how most normal cells move? Were we just looking in the wrong place?
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Good Hair Day -- BioTechniques

A rare hair disorder provides a clue to why hair grows...or doesnít.
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Aging Not Required -- BioTechniques

New work on skeletal muscle and the brain reveals the ability of fountain-of-youth protein GDF11 to turn back the clock body-wide. Aging may never be the same.
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The Eye As a Window to the Kidney -- BioTechniques

A new study shows that tiny glomeruli transplanted into a mouseís eye can filter blood. Can this new technique help us learn about human kidney disease?
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Predicting Fluís Future, One Year at a Time -- BioTechniques

A new model predicts which influenza strain will be most prevalent next year, but glosses over reams of research to do so. If it can help us design more effective vaccines, does it matter?
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Humanity in a World of Hominins -- BioTechniques

The latest, greatest Neanderthal genome sequence shows interbreeding between various hominin groups. Can it also help us figure out just who, exactly, we really are?
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Brain Battle of the Sexes -- BioTechniques

A new study finds that gene expression and splicing in female brains differs from male brains. But does this really matter?
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Eat Ad Libitum Today... With a Side of Cranberries -- BioTechniques

Crimson cranberry sauce brightens holiday tables all over America. Can it help you avoid the inevitable bigger belly, too?
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No Consensus on Incidental Findings -- BioTechniques

Should all patients undergoing genetic testing be automatically screened for all sorts of other disease genes?
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How You Know Where You Are -- BioTechniques

Specialized brain cells help you figure out where you are, and optogenetics shows how they're connected to the rest of your brain.
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Mice Get Smarter with Human Brain Cells -- BioTechniques

By engrafting human glial progenitor cells into the brains of newborn mice, reserchers have made the mice smarter.
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Repeating Nucleotides Encode Dangerous Proteins -- BioTechniques

Do tandem repeats need to be within a translated region in order to cause disease? Apparently not.
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Ho Ho the Mistletoe, Decreasing HSP -- BioTechniques

Mistletoe gives couples the opportunity to share a romantic holiday moment, but could it also kiss cancer goodbye?
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What a Pathogen Needs -- BioTechniques

The pathogen Legionella relies on a mysteriously complex set of protein interactions to undermine a host cellís defenses; now, researchers are solving the mystery.
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Lego-like DNA Building Bricks -- BioTechniques

Single-stranded DNA pieces snap together to form a world of possible nanostructures.
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Researchers Watch RNA Folding -- BioTechniques

For the first time, researchers watch as RNA folds in real-time, nucleotide by nucleotide.
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Our Innate Defense -- Proto

Honorable Mention, 2013 ASJA award for Best Sci/Tech/Biz Article
Our adaptive immune system, armed with T cells and B cells, remembers foreign invaders. No one had thought our other, primitive innate immune system had the same kind of memory. Until now.
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Entry Fee -- Proto

Honorable Mention, 2011 American Society of Journalists and Authors' Outstanding Business and Technology Award
Zinc fingers could pull gene therapy back from the brinkóbut only if more researchers can get their hands on the remarkable proteins.
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Life Altering -- Proto

Synthetic biology blows genetic engineering out of the water, creating cells that can do things like count to three, or even act as primitive computers.
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Shoot the Messenger -- Proto

RNA interference could someday prevent common diseases by silencing the genes that cause them.
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Cooking Up Bigger Brains -- Scientific American

Our hominid ancestors could never have eaten enough raw food to support our large, calorie-hungry brains, Richard Wrangham claims. The secret to our evolution, he says, is cooking.
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The New Heredity -- Proto

Heredity isn't just about genes - sometimes we pass along our environments as well.
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The eye as a window into the brain -- Nature Network Boston

Regenerating the eye helps researchers learn how to repair the brain.
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Can smart dust detect a bio attack? -- Discover

Tiny silicon particles may one day be sprayed into the atmosphere to scan for hazardous chemicals.
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One, two, tie my -- Discover

Scientists use math to determine the most efficient way to lace your shoes.
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Comprehension Test -- Proto

Winner, 2015 ASJA award for Best Science/Technology/Business article

Doctors consistently overestimate how much their patients understand, causing additional pain and suffering. New research is finding ways to close this communication gap.
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You're (Positively, Undeniably, Without a Doubt) Overthinking It! -- Fitness

Trusting your gut can sometimes work better than believing your stressed-out brain.
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Silent Treatment -- Women's Health

The world is noisier than ever before, and it takes a huge toll on our health. Here's how to find some peace and quiet.
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The Body In Pain -- Proto

People who complain about pain may actually feel more of it: new research is showing that hurting is in our genes.
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Prevent water intoxication: How to thwart a stealthy summertime killer -- Backpacker

Dehydration isnít the only killer in the backcountry Ė sometimes drinking too much water is just as deadly. Hereís how to imbibe the perfect amount.
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Q & A with Dr. Harvey Makadon -- The Boston Globe

Makadonís article in the New England Journal of Medicine focuses on the need for better health care for gay and lesbian patients.
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Pain relief for laptop lovers -- Health

Brand-new laptop accessories help preserve your back, vision, and shoulders.
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The Polypill -- Proto

Doctors have created a pill that, if taken by everyone over the age of 55, could prevent over 80% of heart disease cases. But should we medicate an entire age bracket even when thereís nothing wrong with them?
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Is Your Tap Water Safe? -- Good Housekeeping

2013 Recipient of the Endocrine Society Award for Excellence in Science and Medical Journalism
Honorable Mention, 2013 ASJA award for Reporting on a Significant Topic
An in-depth report on the hormones, drugs, and even pesticides that could be flowing unregulated from your faucet, and how they affect your health. Good Housekeeping also tested ordinary water pitchers and refrigerator filters and found that they can get rid of these chemicals.
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Flame Fighters Filter Into Folks -- Nature Network Boston

BU researchers are finding high levels of commonly used flame retardants in the bodies of Massachusetts residents and figuring out how they got there.
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Goodness in a Garden -- Misstropolis.com

The farmer within scratches her way out.
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Sky Islands -- Backpacker

Lush oases packed with rare plants and animals flourish at the top of desert mountains in the American Southwest.
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Heís trying to make the world safer:
Environmental epidemiologist Philippe Grandjean -- The Boston Globe

Environmental scientist Philippe Grandjean believes the chemicals that companies use in products are lowering kidsí IQs and causing an array of neurodevelopmental disorders; his studies are helping prove it.
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Digging up dirt to study storms of the past -- Nature Network Boston

To figure out whether global warming is causing more hurricanes, Woods Hole researcher Jeff Donnelly looks back in time.
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Wasting away on standby -- Discover

Many appliances secretly consume a significant amount of energy while turned off; here are the worst offenders.
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His robots dive deep for treasure -- The Boston Globe

Hanumant Singh builds robots that take breathtaking pictures of all things underwater, including hydrothermal vents, dead whale carcasses, and ancient Greek shipwrecks.
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Crusading veterinarian practices what she preaches -- The Williston Observer

Small-town vet Peggy Larson neuters pets when their owners canít afford to. She also helps save animals all over the world.
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Childrenís librarian leaving -- The Williston Observer

Childrenís librarian Ellen Sinoff is leaving her beloved job at the Williston, VT library for one that can pay the bills, and the kids are hurting.
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Jump to:     Food and Nutrition     General Science     Health     Environment     Profiles